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FreshTartSteph Recipe: Chickpea Flour Frittata


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Stephanie Meyer

You’ve worked late, or have been chauffeuring kids all evening, or were out late with friends. You walk in the door exhausted and starving, craving something more substantial than a bowl of cereal. This hot, fast, pleasantly filling frittata is what to make, especially if you can scrounge a few vegetables from the cooler, whether leftover or fresh.

I’ve called this a frittata, but it really exists somewhere between an omelet and socca crepes. Pleasantly eggy, with the heft of a flatbread, it sturdily cradles any assortment of vegetables. If you like, add pieces of leftover sausage, or a sprinkle of cheese. I like mine topped with Greek yogurt for a bread-n-spread sort of feel, but a drizzle of good olive oil and a generous grinding of black pepper are plenty lovely.

I tend to  make one large version and eat the whole thing by myself, with my hands, cooling my burned fingers and tongue with a cold glass of rosé. If you’re motivated to share, you can certainly fry the batter as two smaller frittatas and top them with an arugula salad dressed with a bit of lemon juice and olive oil.
 

Chickpea Flour Frittata

Serves 1-2

Chickpea flour (also know as garbanzo bean flour or besan) is gluten-free and grain-free and is available in most grocery stores. Bob’s Red Mill sells a widely available variety.

1/3 c. of chopped vegetables, cooked or raw (I used a combination of spinach, peppedew peppers, carrots, and ramps)
1/4 c. chickpea flour
1 large egg
1/4 c. water
1 Tbsp. crumbled feta or goat cheese (optional)
2 Tbsp. diced or crumbled sausage or other meat (optional)
salt
olive oil
freshly ground black pepper

Optional toppings:
Greek yogurt
Olives
Arugula with a squeeze of fresh lemon
Fresh herbs

If you’re working with raw vegetables, heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. When the pan is hot, add 1 Tbsp. of olive oil and vegetables and saute until just tender, about 5 minutes. Set pan aside.

In a medium bowl, whisk together chickpea flour, egg, water, and a pinch of salt. Stir in the vegetables and cheese and/or meat if using.

Place large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add 2 Tbsp. of olive oil to the pan. Pour in the frittata batter and tilt the pan to spread it evenly. Fry the frittata until edges are crispy, 3-4 minutes, then flip and fry the other side until golden.

Slide frittata onto a cutting board and cut into wedges. Drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with a bit of salt and several grinds of black pepper. Serve immediately with optional toppings.
 

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