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Peach and Raspberry Cobbler Recipe


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Photography Mette Nielsen, Food Styling Robin Krause

Ah. The sweet, sweet joys of summer fruit—enjoyed on its own, the perfectly ripe peach comes complete with a little juice that drips down your wrist when you bite into it, which is a welcome small price to pay for the delicious orangey orb. And when you’re ready to share some of those juicy peaches in a dessert, a cobbler is a good option that’s easy to prepare. In this recipe, plump red raspberries also add their distinctive sweet-tart flavor.

Now you may see some desserts called a “slump” and others “cobbler”—so what’s the difference? Slumps and cobblers are both fruit desserts topped with biscuit dough and baked. But, a slump is topped with dropped biscuits, more like dumplings, and a cobbler uses cutout biscuits, notes cookbook author Lori Longbotham, who contributed this recipe to Real Food. Both are traditionally served with heavy cream poured over the top, though ice cream and whipped cream are awfully good, too.


Peach and Raspberry Cobbler

Serves 6

Filling:
10 small firm-ripe peaches
12 c. water
12 c. sugar
4 tsp. cornstarch
1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
12 pint ripe raspberries

Biscuits:
134 c. all-purpose flour
3 tbsp. sugar, plus additional for sprinkling
1 tbsp. baking powder
14 tsp. salt
14 c. (12 stick) cold butter
1 c. heavy cream, plus additional cream or milk for brushing biscuits

Cook peaches in a large pot of boiling water for 1 minute. Peel, pit, and slice peaches. (You should have about 6 cups.)

Preheat oven to 450°F. Have ready a 112-quart shallow baking dish or six individual serving size oven-safe dishes.

To make the filling: Combine peaches, water, sugar, cornstarch, and lemon juice in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat and bring just to a boil, stirring constantly. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes, or just until peaches are beginning to soften. Transfer mixture to baking dish(es) and stir in raspberries.

To make the biscuits: Whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl. Cut in butter. Beat cream with an electric mixer on medium-high speed in a large deep bowl just until it holds soft peaks when beaters are lifted. Make a well in center of dry ingredients, spoon in cream, and stir with a fork just until a dough begins to form.

On a lightly floured surface, knead dough several times. Pat dough out to 34 inch thick and, with a 212-inch cutter, cut out 6 rounds. Gather scraps together and pat out again, if necessary. Arrange on top of peaches, brush with cream, and sprinkle with sugar.

Bake until peaches are bubbling and biscuits are browned, 15 to 17 minutes. Let cobbler cool slightly, and serve warm.

Nutrition info (per serving): Calories 402 (131 From fat); Fat 16g (Sat.9g); Chol 50mg; Sodium 359mg; Carb 64g; Fiber 4g; Protein 6g

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