It Takes a Village and a Fleet

I am looking down the nose of my kids’ schedule this school year and I’m breaking into a sweat. I have no idea how these kids are going to get where they need to go when they need to be there. How do parents do this? From school to home, to Hebrew School to football to gymnastics, then back for piano…

We are purposeful not to over schedule the kids with activities; they each get one. And Hebrew School is non-negotiable—they must go. But when you have three kids, it gets insane. By the way, that was not a rhetorical question before—how do parents do this?

We are a very average family: three kids, two parents, two step-parents (who really do pitch in), and a part-time after school nanny, and we still can’t pull this driving thing together! Our nanny’s schedule doesn’t jive perfectly with the kids’—there are a few days where the planets don’t align, and that has me scrambling for a sixth person to join our schlepping team.

I know I’m preaching to the choir, but how do parents do this?! I’m now in the process of interviewing “drivers” to shuttle the kids where they need to go, and that’s crazy! A few weeks ago on my show, we discussed a new Uber for Kids starting in California. I thought it was nuts that you’d let your kids get into a car with a stranger. After further research, I found the business does vet the drivers and has a secret word only the kids and the vetted driver know. But I still had major reservations about letting my kids get into an Uber. Now, just a few short weeks later, I’m seriously changing my tune. We don’t have Uber for Kids in MN, but if we did, I may consider it.

I’m also not bashing busy kids. Busy kids stay out of trouble. But busy kids need a chauffeur. I’ve taken to Facebook to reach out to other moms to find a driver (I haven’t resorted to Craigslist yet!). If you’ve figured out this working-mom, busy-kid, plan of attack, I’d love to hear your solution.

This week, I wish you a fun-filled schedule and a fleet to help you and the kids get there!

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